Welcome to the official website.

Concerts

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A New York City Night of Grief & Mystery

Tickets for a NYC Night of Grief & Mystery have finally gone on sale. On November 2nd, Stephen, Adam, Lisa and I will be at The New York Society for Ethical Culture. The 100+ year old building sits on the edge of Central Park and the stage in the main hall has played host to a diverse collection of performers and performances. It is NOT small.

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Tickets can be had here:

https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/night-of-grief-mystery-concert-new-york-city-tickets-49365911771


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NOGM Tour Trailer

A good feel for a Night of Grief & Mystery. All the audio you hear was taken from concerts in Australia and the UK. We are happy to be joined on this tour by Adam Hay (drums, vox) and Lisa Hodgson (keys, vox) and feel good about being able to tour this closer to home.  Strange days, indeed.


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Nights of Grief & Mystery tickets on sale now.

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For complete tour dates and ticket info:
https://orphanwisdom.com/events/category/2018-nights-of-grief-mystery-tour/


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CONCERT: Trenton, ON. June 16

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CONCERT: Vain+NOT Alone in Alton, ON. April 28, 2018.

This concert takes place in the intimacy of a beautiful art gallery in the small town of Alton, Ontario.   Artist Paul Morin curates a series of events at the gallery throughout the year bringing high-quality art into the Caledon horse hills north of Toronto.   With Adam Hay on drums.  Lisa Hodgson on vox and keys.  Songs from Vain+Alone, Beggar Heart, The King of Good Intentions.  For tickets/reservations, call The Paul Morin Gallery at (519) 942 4918.


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A San Francisco Night of Grief & Mystery

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On April 20, 2018, at The Swedish American Hall in San Francisco, California, we take version 2.0 of NOG&M for a spin.  Accompanying Stephen and I on stage will be Adam Hay and Lisa Hodgson.  You can find tickets here.

The concert is being presented as a part of Reimagine End of Life, a week of exploring big questions about life and death.

I’m still at a loss when asked to describe the evening.  It’s a collision of sorts between Stephen’s world and mine.  We don’t create material specifically for these nights. Rather, we’ve gingerly introduced writings and stories to their ambient counterparts in front of live audiences and in doing so we’ve discovered a thing or two about the works we didn’t know before subjecting them to an experiment like this.  I’m really not the one who should be trying to describe what goes on, so I’ll use this…something from a concert-goer:

Hearts broken.  Hearts mended.  All on one Dark, Luminous night.


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Fish(es) out of Water

Photograph by John Launer

Last Friday I was preparing to take the stage with The Art of Time Ensemble which included Andrew Burashko, Stephen Sitarski, Drew Jurecka, Rachel Mercer, Joe Phillips, Mark Mariash, Doug Perry, Rob Piltch, special guest noise maker Don Rooke, author/poet Michael Ondaatje, and actor Rick Roberts.  Other vocalists on the shows were Andy Maize, Tom Wilson, and Suzie Ungerlieder.

Some of these folk I have known for some time now, and a couple I am lucky enough to consider close friends.  I don’t get out much, and I’ve never been a social creature.  I failed spectacularly at being part of any scene.  I was pacing back and forth behind backstage thinking how funny it was that these AoT gigs are the one place I get to spend time with artists I’ve only orbited around…Tom, Andy, for intance…or meet for the first time: Suzie, for instance, this time out.   The thing about these gigs is…for some of us more, um, roots/pop inclined singers or musicians… is that we are in strange waters, or fish out of water altogether and it sort of levels a playing field we aren’t even aware exists and we get to see each other make peace with performing things that stretch our own understanding of ourselves.  That sounds a lot more lame than it is.  Put another way, there is not a lot of ego on these shows and that is as refreshing as refreshing gets.

It was the second time I got to work along side of Michael Ondaatje and I finally got the chance (and nerve) to tell him how Coming Through Slaughter has danced on the fringes of my creative consciousness since the day I turned the last page on it.  A couple years ago I got to work with Margaret Atwood and that led to a weird and wonderful night at the opera with her and her family (a shitty version of Don Giovanni, I was told…I wouldn’t have known because I was just happy to there and was kind of geeking out).

Renowned dance company David Earle Dance did an inspiring piece on a show I was on, and it introduced me to the world of modern dance, a world I hadn’t paid much attention to.  Out of our mutual admiration from those nights grew dance pieces to two songs of mine that members of the company, Suzette Sherman and Georgia Simms, choreographed and performed.

Most of my performances with the Art of Time have had me singing at least one arrangement done by Jon Goldsmith. Jon produced my first two recordings for True North and we have been friends since.  He also arranged strings for me on the live concert recording we did almost 10 years ago called Pleasure & Relief (a couple years before I met Burashko and started singing with the AoT).  I admire many of the arrangers whose songs I get to swim in when I sing with the AoT, but none more than Jon and getting to sing a chart of his makes me want to try and make my own songs more…well, more.

I met Don Rooke…inventor, soundologist, and progenitor of Tornto cult faves The Henrys…on an Art of Time gig not so long ago and that led to me singing on The Henrys last recording, 2015’s Quiet Industry, a collection of songs I would urge everyone to check out without reservation.

I’ve learned a great deal watching members of the Art of Time negotiate the rehearsals, speaking in, what is to me, a foreign tongue, having never learned how to read music myself.  I have a great respect for Burashko and his carving out a career in the arts.  This is no small feat.

And nowhere else could I practice pacing the stage guitar-less, singing words that are not mine, trying to figure out who I am in the thing while I’m doing the thing, and all the while wearing a hat and a wee bit of bling.  Thank you , Art of Time Ensemble:  I hardly recognize me.